How to Make Floating Candles

I’m going to show you how to make floating candles, because you never know when you’re going to find yourself in some kind of floating candle emergency situation.  Like an impromptu dinner party or shotgun wedding reception. 

DIY floating candles in a modern bowl with legs.

Making floating candles is a little project that has immense reward with very little effort.  Almost none in fact; if you can light a candle, you can make a floating candle.  If you cannot light a candle you have my condolences on account of the fact you’re just a torso.

There isn’t a single night all year long that I don’t have candles burning.  It all goes back to when I was 4 years old and my mother bought me a pillar birthday candle that had age markings on the side like this horrifyingly ugly one on Amazon ( that I LOVE ).   1 year at the top, all the way down to 13 years at the bottom.  Every birthday I got to haul the candle out of the basement, scrape the dried up centipedes off it and burn it down a full year.   To this day I remember that candle yet I do not remember a single present I got from the age of 1 – 13.

I do remember what I got for my birthday when I was 17.  It was a Royal Doulton figurine called “Sweet 17”.  I wanted red, punk bondage pants with white zippers.  You can see why I’d remember receiving a Royal Doulton instead.

So … floating candles. They aren’t exactly revolutionary but the fact that you can make them out of candles you probably already own is.

All you need are tea lights, which I’m sure 90% of you have right now, and one little tip.

How to make a floating candle out of a tea light.

 

Several tea lights set on a marble countertop.

1.  Remove your tea light candle from its aluminium cup and flip the candle over.

2. Light another candle (a taper candle is the easiest to work with) and drip some wax from it onto the underside of the tea light until the metal wick holder on the bottom is completely sealed.

Sealing the bottom of tea lights with a dripping candle.

Just line all your tea lights up on a surface you can scrape the dripped wax off of and do them in bulk. 

The underside of rows of tea lights, sealed with wax.

 

Stick your candles into a bowl, pond, toilet or bathtub and admire. You just made DIY floating candles because you are a DIY badass. And maybe a little lazy and cheap because you didn’t just go to the store to buy some floating candles. Join the club.

DIY floating tea lights in a modern bowl on a clear glass coffee table with rustic accents around.

 

When they’re prepped like this the candles will last between 45 minutes and 1½ hours depending on the size of the tea light candle.

 

How to Make Floating Candles.

How to Make Floating Candles.

Active Time: 2 minutes
Additional Time: 1 minute
Total Time: 3 minutes
Difficulty: Easy

Make some floating candles out of ordinary tea lights.

Materials

  • tea light candles
  • taper candle (optional)

Instructions

  1. Remove the tea light from its metal cup.
  2. Light a taper candle and drip it over the base of the tea light, sealing the bottom. Let the melted wax solidify.
  3. Float candles in water.

Notes

  1. Floating tea lights don't last as long. A small tea light that would normally burn for 2-3 hours will burn for 30-45 minutes in water.
  2. The bigger the candle, the longer it will last in the water.
  3. Freezing the candle doesn't make it last longer (I tested this out).
  4. For bigger floating candles, use the cheap candles you can buy in a glass holder.  Dollar stores like Dollarama or Dollar Tree have them.  Just set the glass candle holder in a bowl of hot water to loosen the candle inside and pull it out. Seal the bottoms the same way. These larger candles will burn for around 2 hours.
  5. Candles with a slightly smaller bottom than top float better than candles with straight sizes.

Want to make floating taper candles? You can do that too. Here’s my tutorial on how to do it.

TIPS

  • For bigger floating candles, use the cheap candles you can buy in a glass holder.  Dollar stores like Dollarama or Dollar Tree have them.  Just set the glass candle holder in a bowl of hot water to loosen the candle inside and pull it out. Seal the bottoms the same way. These larger candles will burn for around 2 hours.
  • Candles with a slightly smaller bottom than top float better than candles with straight sizes.
  • Freezing the candles prior to burning them will NOT make them last longer. I tested it.

Removing a candle from its glass holder by heating it in water.

These make a fast and easy centrepiece for that impromptu dinner party you might have.  Float a flower or two in a bowl with some floating candles and you’re automatically inducted into the Martha Stewart hall of fame.  Extra Martha points if you use white candles. 

I do not have impromptu dinner parties, but you might.  I’m more of an “I like to think about having dinner parties but mainly read cookbooks while watching Netflix instead ” kind of gal.

Floating tea lights in modern clear glass bowl on rustic harvest table.

That’s all there is to making floating candles out of regular candles.  Just seal up any area on the bottom where water might be able to get in, stick the candles in water, light them and wait for the compliments to come rolling in.

Of course, if you’re just a torso you will come rolling in too.

How to Make Floating Candles

92 Comments

  1. Deb S says:

    Well, shit. I wish I’d know this a month ago when I was getting married and paying for a bag of 24 floating candles on Amazon. Oh well, I’ll be reselling them to some other clueless schmuck.

  2. Hanna says:

    Just wondering if, after the burning has all finished, there’s wax left stuck to the container? This would determine if I do this in an heirloom bowl or a cheaper one.

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