DIY a Birdbath with this Ikea Hack.

It is with great regret and displeasure that I announce to you … I have no jellybeans. Kindda craving them. Also, this is the final cheap birdbath post. For now anyway. I actually have plans to make another birdbath, but it involves me learning how to chip out a dip in the top of a mammoth sized rock and polish it to a finish as smooth as a career criminal’s fingerprints.

If there are any dip chippers out there, lemme know how to get started. My initial plan was to use fertilizer to make a little rock blasting bomb but with the G-20 in town I don’t want to raise any unnecessary suspicions. My next thought was dynamite but that might not be a good idea. Dynamite is a one way road to too big of a dip.

So the first birdbath was free and very organic looking. The second birdbath was $6 and very contemporary. Sparse even. This final birdbath will cost around $20 and is a combination of organic and sleek. And I must say it’s my favourite.

Just to give you an idea of what you can get for $20 … here’s a $20 birdbath I found at my local hardware store. It actually looks quite elegant in the picture compared to real life.

This specimen is made from an attractive combination of white plastic and white plastic.

So you can go and pay $20 for this birdbath, which is so lightweight it would definitely tip over and therefore embarrass the portlier birds.   Or … you can gather:

a few wood dowels

… and this organic shaped candle plate from Ikea

ANY CHARA CTER HERE

To create this:

To me this birdbath is the best of both worlds if you’re willing to spend the money.    And quite frankly, I already owned the Ikea candle plate (currently found in the candle section of Ikea) and 2 of the 3 dowels.

So while this would cost you approximately $20 – $25, it cost me $3.00.

Materials:

3 wood dowels @ $3 each (or 3 old wood broom handles if you have them around)

Brown & black paint

Varathane (satin finish)

Ikea candle plate @ $14.99.

As you may have noticed I stained my dowels dark brown. You can leave yours natural if you like. Or you can paint them purple. Or green or pink or blue or black or saffron or eggplant or polka dotted. Actually polka dotted wouldn’t go with the candle plate, so scratch polka dot. Please don’t paint your dowels polka dotted.

Click right about here … no HERE … no hereto learn how to stain the dowels with paint.

Your dowels need to be at least 3 or 4 feet long if you want a really elevated birdbath like I have. I like the drama of it, plus it makes the birdbath easier to see from the other end of the backyard where I eat and lounge and daydream. Pfftt. I don’t do any of those things.

After you hammer the dowels into the ground grab yourself a handy dandy level and make sure the dowels are level.   Duh.  It’s hard to tell if the birdbath is level just by looking at it because the Ikea candle holder is shaped irregularly with one side of it being higher than the others.  When you set it on the dowels it looks a bit wonky and you (and by you I mean me) second guess your eye levelling.

 

I love my level. It’s red.

ANY CHARA CTER HERE

Now for the pretty pictures!

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ANY CHARA CTER HERE

So there you have it. 3 ways to create a birdbath, all for less than the cost of 1,500 jellybeans. Or a bag of fertilizer.

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