Country Christmas Wrapping! Brown Paper Packages Tied up with String

In keeping with this week’s theme of ohmygodistillhavesomuchtodohowdidthishappen, I’m going right into today’s post.  There will be no funny.  None.  This here is a bare, bones post with pretty pictures.  And hopefully some inspiration.  And intrigue.  And maybe even a MURDER!

But probably not.

I have a great story about a bag of potato chips, an eye patch and a fainting goat but that’s gonna have to wait until I have more time to do it justice.

Because today is about brown paper packages tied up with string.  And you know what?  They really are one of my favourite things.

 

Tree & Gifts

 

A month or so ago, when I realized I’d be using pinecones as bows, I contacted the place that makes my chicken feed.  Homestead Organics makes … as you may have guessed unless you’re really stupid … organic feed.  And their bags are beautiful.  I knew I wanted to use them as my wrapping paper this year, but never in a million years were my chickens going to go through that amount of feed in a month.  So the kind folks at Homestead Organics sent me a box of their unused feed bags to do my wrapping with.

wrapping 1

 

It’d be a bit much if I wrapped every present in the feed bags, so I rounded things out with a buttery yellow paper and plain brown paper packages  Which of course I had to tie up with string.  Twine if we’re being brutally honest here.  Twine from the Dollar Store.  Brown paper … Dollar Store.

wrapping 4

 

You probably recognize the Pinecone Bows I made last week.  I added those to the presents along with the twine as ribbon and a long, fresh piece of white pine.

wrapping 5

 

The tags are thin pieces of wood slices, which I just drilled a hole into and wrote on with pencil.  ‘Cause Laura Ingalls would have used pencil.  It’s all in the detail.   And yes.  I got the slices of wood at the Dollar Store.  It was one of my great finds from last year.  I had no idea what I’d use them for at the time but knew they’d make an appearance in my life at some point.  If you don’t happen to have slices of wood around the house I’ll let you know what else you can use that you can buy just about anywhere.  In a moment.  But first … the obligatory cat shot.

Cleo Final 2

 

I think it’s really important to match your wrapping to your pets.  Just imagine how hideous this picture would be if I had a plaid cat.  Always match to your animals.

wrapping 6

 

If you don’t have the time or inclination to track down feed bags, can’t find slices of wood and can’t be bothered to hot glue pine cones together … I’m not sure what the hell you’re doing here.  But I do have another option for you.  Just wrap your presents in brown paper with twine, attach a single pinecone, and use these buff paper price tags.  Beautifulllllllll.  And it matches most breeds of cat and dog.

wrapping 7

 

And horses.

Tree & Gifts 2

 

So there you have it.  Just about the cheapest wrapping job you can get and if I do say so myself, probably the prettiest.  To wrap with the feedbags, I literally just stuffed the present inside and wrapped it up with tape, so whoever gets a present in a feed bag, gets to recycle the feedbag themselves as a garbage bag, table runner or pillow sham.  Yay!  Or … maybe I’m the only one who thinks that’s Yay!

So to recap ..

To Get this Look …

Wrap with brown paper (Dollar Store)

Tie up with string (Dollar Store)

Adorn with Pinecone (Dollar Store or the ground)

Tag it with a manilla price tag

Shove in a piece of long greenery (whatever your neighbours happen to have growing on their front lawn)

How’s that for a nice little wrapping job?  I murdered it.  Heh.

 

69 Comments

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  2. Sue Kopp says:

    Stunning!What a great idea. Cannot wait to try this. It has been years since I did it, but these are adorable!

    • Karen says:

      Thanks Sue! I change my wrapping every year but … I might not have the heart to this year. I still love the brown paper wrapping. ~ karen!

  3. celia says:

    Hey you! It’s been awhile since your last posting on dollar store finds…I need inspirations! 8-D

    Thanks!

  4. Traci says:

    This is just cracking me up. I had actually already wrapped many of my gifts in Trader Joe’s bags before reading this post! They actually printed holiday gift tags and designs to make garlands out of the bags on them. The simple red and white designs on the brown paper look great and it all goes so well with the one roll of red penguin wrapping paper I had leftover from last year. I especially like the ones in which I flipped the bag over to plain brown and then used the patterned strips as the ribbon.

  5. Erin Hall {i can craft that} says:

    what variety of tree did you select?

    • Karen says:

      Erin – I picked the most perfect tree known to mankind! (For a Christmas tree that is) The Frasier Fir. Nice soft needles, stiff branches, and doesn’t drop it’s needles. The only tree I liked the look of as much was when I bought a Blue Spruce one year which was SPECTACULAR, but also very, VERY sharp and picky. ~ karen!

  6. Bols says:

    Karen,
    the Homestead Organics bags are just lovely and your Christmas tree is beautiful. I was so inspired by an earlier-in-the-year post of yours about buying vintage Christmas ornaments and I proudly purchased about a dozen smaller baubles at a garage sale … for a full $1! (Actually, for a $1.10 – I was walking my dogs and I came upon the garage sale in the neighbourhood. I didn’t want to return home (the dogs would be horribly disappointed) and I all had on me was a dime – so I gave it to the nice lady in charge as a “deposit” so that she knows that I am a very serious buyer. Later I returned with the loonie and I told her to keep the $.10 as an interest.

    :-)

    Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to you & the family (this includes the chickens).

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